sixity how-to repair guides

How To Change Snowmobile Oil

When to Change the Oil in Your Snowmobile

Recommended schedules for oil changes in snowmobiles will vary slightly by manufacturer but generally speaking oil should be changed after 500 miles on a brand new sled and 2500 miles thereafter.


Aficionados recommend you change the oil regardless of the miles at the beginning of each season. The reasoning behind this practice is that the engine and the oil can be exposed to condensation during storage in the off season and given that oil is the "blood" of an engine, it's better to start off the season with a new, clean transfusion.


A snowmobile oil change is a legitimate DIY project that can save you a nice chunk of change but the first time you try it it's going to take some time. You'll soon discover that the most time consuming part of this process is just getting to the drain plug and sealing everything up again after you've changed the oil. Each manufacturer will have different specific instructions so we advise that you carefully review your owner's manual.


The instructions listed below are for a Yamaha Nytro and while they may vary from your snowmobile in detail they will be the same basic steps required despite the brand.


Things You'll Need:

  • 4 quarts 0/40-weight full-synthetic oil
  • Oil filter and 2 copper oil plug gaskets
  • Floor jack and jack stands
  • Torque wrench
  • Socket wrench 10 mm and 12 mm
  • Screwdriver
  • Allen wrench 5 mm
  • Drain pan
  • Funnel
  • Smartphone
  • Owner's manual

Preparation

  1. Start the engine and let it idle for 10 minutes to ensure the oil is warm. Trying to drain cold oil from a dry sump system is a bummer. Next use the floor jack and jack stands or other devices that can elevate the snowmobile and safely support it.
  2. Remove the hood and side panels.
  3. The two lower side panels are connected to the belly pan using pushpins and four bolts. Use the flat head screwdriver to remove the pushpins and the 10 mm wrench to remove the bolts. When you remove the bolts note how the flanged-washers are installed so reinstallation goes without a hitch. You may want to take a picture with your smartphone so you have a visual reference to use when putting it all back together.
  4. With the panels removed you can now uninstall the belly pan. This is another photo opportunity as there are six pushpins holding the belly pan in place. With the belly pan removed you now have access to the oil filter and drain plug.

Changing the Oil and Filter

  1. Locate the oil drain plug. Below the oil filter you'll see several Allen head screws. One will have a copper washer and that's the drain plug.
  2. Position the drain pan under the drain plug and remove the plug using the 5 mm Allen wrench.
  3. Remove the oil filter.
  4. There won't be much oil that drains from the crankcase as most of it is in the oil reservoir. Locate the drain plug for the reservoir, place a second drip pan under it and use the 12 mm wrench to remove the plug. You'll get about 3 quarts of oil coming out of reservoir.
  5. Remove the copper washers from the drain plugs and replace them with the new ones.
  6. Once the oil has drained replace the filter and both drain plugs. Use a torque wrench and give the filter 10 foot pounds, the oil reservoir plug 11 and 7 on the crankcase plug.
  7. Unscrew the filler cap and add about 3 ½ quarts of oil. Screw the cap back on, start the engine and let it idle for about 3 minutes and check for leaks.
  8. Immediately after you shut down the engine check the oil level and add additional oil if necessary.
  9. Your oil change is complete. Remove the drip pans from under the sled and begin the reassembly process.

Your first attempt at this process will probably take you a bit over an hour. Subsequent changes should see you completing the task in less than 45 minutes.


- End of Procedure -


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How To Change Snowmobile Oil

When to Change the Oil in Your Snowmobile

Recommended schedules for oil changes in snowmobiles will vary slightly by manufacturer but generally speaking oil should be changed after 500 miles on a brand new sled and 2500 miles thereafter.


Aficionados recommend you change the oil regardless of the miles at the beginning of each season. The reasoning behind this practice is that the engine and the oil can be exposed to condensation during storage in the off season and given that oil is the "blood" of an engine, it's better to start off the season with a new, clean transfusion.


A snowmobile oil change is a legitimate DIY project that can save you a nice chunk of change but the first time you try it it's going to take some time. You'll soon discover that the most time consuming part of this process is just getting to the drain plug and sealing everything up again after you've changed the oil. Each manufacturer will have different specific instructions so we advise that you carefully review your owner's manual.


The instructions listed below are for a Yamaha Nytro and while they may vary from your snowmobile in detail they will be the same basic steps required despite the brand.


Things You'll Need:

  • 4 quarts 0/40-weight full-synthetic oil
  • Oil filter and 2 copper oil plug gaskets
  • Floor jack and jack stands
  • Torque wrench
  • Socket wrench 10 mm and 12 mm
  • Screwdriver
  • Allen wrench 5 mm
  • Drain pan
  • Funnel
  • Smartphone
  • Owner's manual

Preparation

  1. Start the engine and let it idle for 10 minutes to ensure the oil is warm. Trying to drain cold oil from a dry sump system is a bummer. Next use the floor jack and jack stands or other devices that can elevate the snowmobile and safely support it.
  2. Remove the hood and side panels.
  3. The two lower side panels are connected to the belly pan using pushpins and four bolts. Use the flat head screwdriver to remove the pushpins and the 10 mm wrench to remove the bolts. When you remove the bolts note how the flanged-washers are installed so reinstallation goes without a hitch. You may want to take a picture with your smartphone so you have a visual reference to use when putting it all back together.
  4. With the panels removed you can now uninstall the belly pan. This is another photo opportunity as there are six pushpins holding the belly pan in place. With the belly pan removed you now have access to the oil filter and drain plug.

Changing the Oil and Filter

  1. Locate the oil drain plug. Below the oil filter you'll see several Allen head screws. One will have a copper washer and that's the drain plug.
  2. Position the drain pan under the drain plug and remove the plug using the 5 mm Allen wrench.
  3. Remove the oil filter.
  4. There won't be much oil that drains from the crankcase as most of it is in the oil reservoir. Locate the drain plug for the reservoir, place a second drip pan under it and use the 12 mm wrench to remove the plug. You'll get about 3 quarts of oil coming out of reservoir.
  5. Remove the copper washers from the drain plugs and replace them with the new ones.
  6. Once the oil has drained replace the filter and both drain plugs. Use a torque wrench and give the filter 10 foot pounds, the oil reservoir plug 11 and 7 on the crankcase plug.
  7. Unscrew the filler cap and add about 3 ½ quarts of oil. Screw the cap back on, start the engine and let it idle for about 3 minutes and check for leaks.
  8. Immediately after you shut down the engine check the oil level and add additional oil if necessary.
  9. Your oil change is complete. Remove the drip pans from under the sled and begin the reassembly process.

Your first attempt at this process will probably take you a bit over an hour. Subsequent changes should see you completing the task in less than 45 minutes.


- End of Procedure -


Return to all Repair & Install Guides