sixity how-to repair guides
sixity how-to repair guides

How To Replace and Install a Snowmobile Battery

When to Replace Your Snowmobile Battery

Ideally you'll change your battery before it completely throws craps. Because the snowmobile is a recreational ride and not your everyday transportation you will probably pay more attention to the slow starts or dim headlights that give you the clues to at least check the charge in your battery.


Because of seasonal use and the extreme operating climates that they are exposed to, snowmobile batteries require more maintenance than most any other "automotive" battery. Staying on top of the health of your battery can prevent an embarrassing and slow tow in from the trail.


So Where is Your Battery?

That's a good question. Because designers had to cram a bunch of components in a very small space and keep them all low to the ground, different manufacturers have come up with different battery mount configurations. As a general rule they are under the hood. However, to get to them can be as easy as removing the hood and a panel or two to disassembling the entire front end, removing the windshield and instrument cluster.


That's why we show a "time to complete between 20 minutes and an hour" and that's why we only talk about the steps in actually replacing the battery. You'll need to consult your owner's manual to get the instructions for the proper sequence of panel removal to get to the battery.


Things You'll Need:

  • Correct replacement battery
  • Socket set
  • Disposable rag
  • Bottle of vinegar

Preparation

The only preparation involved is getting to the battery in the first place. However, there is one advantage to removing multiple panels and that's exposing the rest of the "works." Take the time to clean and inspect the clutches, the drive belt and connection bolts.


Replacing the Battery

  1. The battery will either be exposed and held in place with a restraining bar or it will be inside a box. If you battery is in a box remove the top cover.
  2. Inspect the terminals and cable connections. If you have a build up of a white powdery substance you have battery acid. Pour a little vinegar on the area with the acid and give it a minute to neutralize the acid. Wipe clean with the rag and dispose of it.
  3. Disconnect the negative cable (black cable) first and fold out of the way.
  4. Disconnect the positive cable (red cable) and move out of the way.
  5. If the battery is held in place with a restraining bar remove the bar.
  6. Some batteries will come with a handy strap that you can use to remove the battery but most don't. Lift the old battery out and set aside.
  7. Place the new battery in the mount and connect the positive cable first.
  8. Connect the negative cable.
  9. Secure the restraining bar or "box top."
  10. Test the battery by starting the bike.
  11. Dispose of the old battery either at the shop where you purchased the new one or at a municipal facility for toxic waste.

Now you can start reassembling your panels knowing you have the volts and cranking power to get you through the season.


- End of Procedure -


Return to all Repair & Install Guides

How To Replace and Install a Snowmobile Battery

When to Replace Your Snowmobile Battery

Ideally you'll change your battery before it completely throws craps. Because the snowmobile is a recreational ride and not your everyday transportation you will probably pay more attention to the slow starts or dim headlights that give you the clues to at least check the charge in your battery.


Because of seasonal use and the extreme operating climates that they are exposed to, snowmobile batteries require more maintenance than most any other "automotive" battery. Staying on top of the health of your battery can prevent an embarrassing and slow tow in from the trail.


So Where is Your Battery?

That's a good question. Because designers had to cram a bunch of components in a very small space and keep them all low to the ground, different manufacturers have come up with different battery mount configurations. As a general rule they are under the hood. However, to get to them can be as easy as removing the hood and a panel or two to disassembling the entire front end, removing the windshield and instrument cluster.


That's why we show a "time to complete between 20 minutes and an hour" and that's why we only talk about the steps in actually replacing the battery. You'll need to consult your owner's manual to get the instructions for the proper sequence of panel removal to get to the battery.


Things You'll Need:

  • Correct replacement battery
  • Socket set
  • Disposable rag
  • Bottle of vinegar

Preparation

The only preparation involved is getting to the battery in the first place. However, there is one advantage to removing multiple panels and that's exposing the rest of the "works." Take the time to clean and inspect the clutches, the drive belt and connection bolts.


Replacing the Battery

  1. The battery will either be exposed and held in place with a restraining bar or it will be inside a box. If you battery is in a box remove the top cover.
  2. Inspect the terminals and cable connections. If you have a build up of a white powdery substance you have battery acid. Pour a little vinegar on the area with the acid and give it a minute to neutralize the acid. Wipe clean with the rag and dispose of it.
  3. Disconnect the negative cable (black cable) first and fold out of the way.
  4. Disconnect the positive cable (red cable) and move out of the way.
  5. If the battery is held in place with a restraining bar remove the bar.
  6. Some batteries will come with a handy strap that you can use to remove the battery but most don't. Lift the old battery out and set aside.
  7. Place the new battery in the mount and connect the positive cable first.
  8. Connect the negative cable.
  9. Secure the restraining bar or "box top."
  10. Test the battery by starting the bike.
  11. Dispose of the old battery either at the shop where you purchased the new one or at a municipal facility for toxic waste.

Now you can start reassembling your panels knowing you have the volts and cranking power to get you through the season.


- End of Procedure -


Return to all Repair & Install Guides