sixity how-to repair guides
sixity how-to repair guides

How To Replace and Install a Motorcycle Clutch

When to Replace Your Motorcycle Clutch

Your clutch is really shot when your engine is revving and you are going nowhere. This doesn't happen overnight. You'll notice a slipping when you shift and you'll also notice that acceleration has dropped off significantly.


Changing out a motorcycle clutch is not that difficult to do meaning you can save a nice piece of change on labor if you do it yourself. One thing is for sure. When your clutch starts to fail it is not going to magically repair itself. At some point you will have to change it or start walking.


Things You'll Need:

  • Correct replacement clutch
  • Socket set
  • Torque wrench
  • Flat head screwdriver
  • Owner's manual or technical manual
  • Replacement transmission oil
  • Drip pan
  • Funnel

Preparation

First it is important to know that the steps we outline here are general in nature and may be different from your particular bike. Always consult your owner's manual if there is a step listed here that doesn't match the clutch on your motorcycle.


It's suggested that you soak the friction plates of your new clutch in transmission oil overnight. When you're ready to start we suggest you use a bike stand so that you have a level surface to work with. This will help in draining the transmission oil and will minimize the chance of the springs in the clutch plate bolts from popping out unexpectedly.


Lastly, it's also important to refer to your manual to get the torque specs for the transmission oil drain plug and pressure plate.


How to Change Out a Motorcycle Clutch

  1. Drain the transmission fluid from your bike by placing a drip pan under the drain plug, removing the chain inspection panel and then removing the drain plug. A complete drain will take about 5 minutes.
  2. The first step in removing the clutch is to remove the clutch cover. The brake pedal will probably be in the way of the cover and needs to be pushed down. You can do this by spreading the brake pads and ten pushing down on the pedal. You can hold the pedal in the down position by wedging the tip of a screwdriver to hold it in place.
  3. The clutch cover has bolts securing it. Unbolt them and remove the cover. You may need the tip of a flat head screwdriver to pry a bit of the cover up.
  4. The pressure plate is located under the clutch cover. There will be 6 to 8 bolts and you want to unbolt them using a crisscross technique similar to what you would use when removing lug nuts on a tire. There are springs in the bolt housing. Make sure if one pops out you track it down. With the bolts out remove the pressure plate.
  5. Directly beneath the pressure plate is the lifter. Remove that and set it aside.
  6. Now it's time to remove the plates. If the clutch is OEM you may have judder springs or cushion rings. If you are installing an OEM clutch save them otherwise throw them away as they are not used with aftermarket clutches.
  7. With the old plates out it's time to insert the new. Start with a friction plate then a metal plate then a friction plate and so on. The last plate you install should be a friction plate.
  8. Put the lifter in place. Re-install the pressure plate using the same crisscross technique on the bolts that you used taking them out. Check your manual for the torque spec and use the torque wrench to tighten to spec.
  9. Place the clutch cover over the pressure plate and secure the bolts.
  10. Remove the screwdriver "wedge" and pump the brake pedal until it returns to its normal position.
  11. Re-install the transmission oil drain plug making certain not to over tighten.
  12. Insert a funnel into the primary chain inspection hole and pour approximately one quart of transmission oil slowly.
  13. Make sure the chain inspection hole cover is clean and that the O ring is in good shape then re-install.

This completes the process of installing a new clutch on your motorcycle. Remember to consult your owner's manual or a technical manual if you encounter a situation not covered here.


- End of Procedure -


Return to all Repair & Install Guides

How To Replace and Install a Motorcycle Clutch

When to Replace Your Motorcycle Clutch

Your clutch is really shot when your engine is revving and you are going nowhere. This doesn't happen overnight. You'll notice a slipping when you shift and you'll also notice that acceleration has dropped off significantly.


Changing out a motorcycle clutch is not that difficult to do meaning you can save a nice piece of change on labor if you do it yourself. One thing is for sure. When your clutch starts to fail it is not going to magically repair itself. At some point you will have to change it or start walking.


Things You'll Need:

  • Correct replacement clutch
  • Socket set
  • Torque wrench
  • Flat head screwdriver
  • Owner's manual or technical manual
  • Replacement transmission oil
  • Drip pan
  • Funnel

Preparation

First it is important to know that the steps we outline here are general in nature and may be different from your particular bike. Always consult your owner's manual if there is a step listed here that doesn't match the clutch on your motorcycle.


It's suggested that you soak the friction plates of your new clutch in transmission oil overnight. When you're ready to start we suggest you use a bike stand so that you have a level surface to work with. This will help in draining the transmission oil and will minimize the chance of the springs in the clutch plate bolts from popping out unexpectedly.


Lastly, it's also important to refer to your manual to get the torque specs for the transmission oil drain plug and pressure plate.


How to Change Out a Motorcycle Clutch

  1. Drain the transmission fluid from your bike by placing a drip pan under the drain plug, removing the chain inspection panel and then removing the drain plug. A complete drain will take about 5 minutes.
  2. The first step in removing the clutch is to remove the clutch cover. The brake pedal will probably be in the way of the cover and needs to be pushed down. You can do this by spreading the brake pads and ten pushing down on the pedal. You can hold the pedal in the down position by wedging the tip of a screwdriver to hold it in place.
  3. The clutch cover has bolts securing it. Unbolt them and remove the cover. You may need the tip of a flat head screwdriver to pry a bit of the cover up.
  4. The pressure plate is located under the clutch cover. There will be 6 to 8 bolts and you want to unbolt them using a crisscross technique similar to what you would use when removing lug nuts on a tire. There are springs in the bolt housing. Make sure if one pops out you track it down. With the bolts out remove the pressure plate.
  5. Directly beneath the pressure plate is the lifter. Remove that and set it aside.
  6. Now it's time to remove the plates. If the clutch is OEM you may have judder springs or cushion rings. If you are installing an OEM clutch save them otherwise throw them away as they are not used with aftermarket clutches.
  7. With the old plates out it's time to insert the new. Start with a friction plate then a metal plate then a friction plate and so on. The last plate you install should be a friction plate.
  8. Put the lifter in place. Re-install the pressure plate using the same crisscross technique on the bolts that you used taking them out. Check your manual for the torque spec and use the torque wrench to tighten to spec.
  9. Place the clutch cover over the pressure plate and secure the bolts.
  10. Remove the screwdriver "wedge" and pump the brake pedal until it returns to its normal position.
  11. Re-install the transmission oil drain plug making certain not to over tighten.
  12. Insert a funnel into the primary chain inspection hole and pour approximately one quart of transmission oil slowly.
  13. Make sure the chain inspection hole cover is clean and that the O ring is in good shape then re-install.

This completes the process of installing a new clutch on your motorcycle. Remember to consult your owner's manual or a technical manual if you encounter a situation not covered here.


- End of Procedure -


Return to all Repair & Install Guides