sixity how-to repair guides
sixity how-to repair guides

How To Replace and Install a Motorcycle Battery

When to Replace Your Motorcycle Battery

There's a reason that providing jump starts is a bread and butter business for AAA. Americans are always in a hurry and it doesn't matter if you are driving an SUV or a motorcycle we almost always ignore those first signs that the battery is going south. We hear that whir, whir, whir sound of a struggling start but we have places to go and people to see so we put off dealing with it until "later."


Often times "later" turns out to be when you go to start your bike and hear a click, click, click or nothing at all.


Most motorcycle batteries come with a prorated warranty covering a specified number of years. If your battery is relatively new and it sounds weak then there is a possibility that it has a bad cell or your stator/alternator is bad. If you are in year 4 of a 5 year battery and you hear the warning sounds then it's time to start thinking about a replacement.


Things You'll Need:

  • Correct replacement battery
  • Screwdriver
  • Socket set
  • Socket wrench set
  • Disposable rag
  • Bottle of vinegar

Preparation

Most motorcycle batteries are located under the seat and most seats can be removed using these simple steps.

  1. Unbolt the seat mounts located at the back of the seat.
  2. Lift the back of the seat and pull to the rear. The front of the seat will have a tongue that slides into the frame and pulling the seat will disengage the tongue.
  3. All seats have a retainer strap. Slide the seat through the retainer strap and then place the seat out of the way.
  4. The battery is now accessible and ready for changing.

Changing the Battery

  1. Inspect both the positive and negative terminals. If there is a buildup of white powdery substance you have battery acid present which can do a nasty job on your fingers or hand. If battery acid exists, pour a little vinegar on it and give it a moment to neutralize the acid. Wipe the resulting liquid with a rag and then dispose of it.
  2. Disconnect the negative cable (black cable) first and fold out of the way.
  3. Disconnect the positive cable (red cable) and move out of the way.
  4. Most batteries will have a restraining device, either a bar or a plastic guard. Remove or move aside the restraining device.
  5. Some batteries come with a handy strap for pulling the battery out. If yours doesn't slide your hands down the sides and lift.
  6. Install the new battery making sure the battery posts are lined up with the appropriate battery cables.
  7. Attach the positive cable first and tighten the connection.
  8. Attach the negative cable second. You might see a small spark when you initially attach the cable.
  9. Reinstall the restraining device.
  10. Test the battery by starting the bike and turning on all the accessories.
  11. Reinstall the seat in the reverse order of removing it.

Disposing of the Old Battery

If you purchase your replacement battery from a brick and mortar store you will be assessed a "core charge" to "dispose" of your old battery. This charge will be refunded if you bring your old battery to the store.


However if you find yourself with an old motorcycle (or auto) battery sitting in your garage, know that it's illegal to dispose of it via regular trash collection. It is considered a hazardous material. Some states/municipalities have special hazardous material collection days/sites when batteries and other items can be disposed of for no cost. Check your local waste disposal service for details.


- End of Procedure -


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How To Replace and Install a Motorcycle Battery

When to Replace Your Motorcycle Battery

There's a reason that providing jump starts is a bread and butter business for AAA. Americans are always in a hurry and it doesn't matter if you are driving an SUV or a motorcycle we almost always ignore those first signs that the battery is going south. We hear that whir, whir, whir sound of a struggling start but we have places to go and people to see so we put off dealing with it until "later."


Often times "later" turns out to be when you go to start your bike and hear a click, click, click or nothing at all.


Most motorcycle batteries come with a prorated warranty covering a specified number of years. If your battery is relatively new and it sounds weak then there is a possibility that it has a bad cell or your stator/alternator is bad. If you are in year 4 of a 5 year battery and you hear the warning sounds then it's time to start thinking about a replacement.


Things You'll Need:

  • Correct replacement battery
  • Screwdriver
  • Socket set
  • Socket wrench set
  • Disposable rag
  • Bottle of vinegar

Preparation

Most motorcycle batteries are located under the seat and most seats can be removed using these simple steps.

  1. Unbolt the seat mounts located at the back of the seat.
  2. Lift the back of the seat and pull to the rear. The front of the seat will have a tongue that slides into the frame and pulling the seat will disengage the tongue.
  3. All seats have a retainer strap. Slide the seat through the retainer strap and then place the seat out of the way.
  4. The battery is now accessible and ready for changing.

Changing the Battery

  1. Inspect both the positive and negative terminals. If there is a buildup of white powdery substance you have battery acid present which can do a nasty job on your fingers or hand. If battery acid exists, pour a little vinegar on it and give it a moment to neutralize the acid. Wipe the resulting liquid with a rag and then dispose of it.
  2. Disconnect the negative cable (black cable) first and fold out of the way.
  3. Disconnect the positive cable (red cable) and move out of the way.
  4. Most batteries will have a restraining device, either a bar or a plastic guard. Remove or move aside the restraining device.
  5. Some batteries come with a handy strap for pulling the battery out. If yours doesn't slide your hands down the sides and lift.
  6. Install the new battery making sure the battery posts are lined up with the appropriate battery cables.
  7. Attach the positive cable first and tighten the connection.
  8. Attach the negative cable second. You might see a small spark when you initially attach the cable.
  9. Reinstall the restraining device.
  10. Test the battery by starting the bike and turning on all the accessories.
  11. Reinstall the seat in the reverse order of removing it.

Disposing of the Old Battery

If you purchase your replacement battery from a brick and mortar store you will be assessed a "core charge" to "dispose" of your old battery. This charge will be refunded if you bring your old battery to the store.


However if you find yourself with an old motorcycle (or auto) battery sitting in your garage, know that it's illegal to dispose of it via regular trash collection. It is considered a hazardous material. Some states/municipalities have special hazardous material collection days/sites when batteries and other items can be disposed of for no cost. Check your local waste disposal service for details.


- End of Procedure -


Return to all Repair & Install Guides