sixity how-to repair guides

How To Replace and Install an ATV Battery

When to Replace Your ATV Battery

In a car if the battery is slow to turn the engine and it's within a year or so of its service life you're first reaction would probably be that the battery is bad and needs a replacement. Don't be so quick in your judgment if your ATV battery acts the same way.


Unlike the battery in your everyday ride your ATV battery may go for prolonged periods without the benefit of an alternator pumping juice back into it. Make sure your ATV battery is actually "dead" and not just fully discharged before you go to the expense of a new battery. This article will explain how to test your battery and how to keep it maintained during the off season.


Things You'll Need:

  • Ratchet wrench and socket set
  • Replacement battery
  • Distilled water
  • Vinegar or baking soda
  • Old shop towel

Removing and Replacing the ATV Battery

Different brands will have different locations but many copy motorcycles and place the battery under the seat. Check your owner's manual for the exact location of yours.


  1. The first step is to remove the seat. Under the rear of the saddle there will be a latch that releases the back of the seat. There are two tabs or prongs that secure the front of the seat. With the back of the seat free, pull back and up to disengage the front tabs and set the seat aside. The battery is now accessible.
  2. If your battery cables are bolted to the battery terminals, use a socket to remove the negative cable first then the positive.
  3. There will be a retaining bar that secures the battery to the battery compartment. Unbolt and remove.
  4. If you have battery acid on the terminals or the ends of your cables take a solution of vinegar and water or baking soda and water and wash it off using the old towel. Remove the battery and set it to the side. Take this opportunity to clean any acid from the battery compartment.
  5. Place the new battery in the battery compartment.
  6. Connect the positive cable to the positive post first. Tighten the connection.
  7. Connect the negative cable to the negative post and tighten the connection.
  8. Re-install the retaining bar.
  9. Re-install the seat.

How to Get More Life Out of Your Battery

As a rule your battery will lose 1% of its charge for every day it is not in use. So if you don't ride your machine for 30 days your battery probably has a 70% charge. If you let the battery sit idle for 60 days you may have hit the point where it simply won't be possible to recover a full charge.


Here are a couple of things you don't want to do to recharge your battery.


  • Don't fire up the engine every day or so and let the engine idle for a moment. You will suck more power out of the battery starting the engine than the alternator can possibly replace. Also you will most likely foul your plugs.
  • Idling the engine for a prolonged time won't work any better. At idle RPM the stator will take forever to provide a significant recharge.

The best solution is to invest in a battery tender. This is a trickle charger that connects to your battery posts and plugs into a wall socket. It will slowly charge your battery and then keep it fully charged. It takes 5 minutes to hook up and guarantees you'll have the amps when you need them.


If you are done for a season, remove the battery and place it on a work table and connect it to the battery tender so you will have a fully charged unit when you get back on the saddle next season. These batteries are expensive and they don't last as long as car batteries. Taking the time to care for them can give you the biggest bang for your buck.


- End of Procedure -


Return to all Repair & Install Guides

How To Replace and Install an ATV Battery

When to Replace Your ATV Battery

In a car if the battery is slow to turn the engine and it's within a year or so of its service life you're first reaction would probably be that the battery is bad and needs a replacement. Don't be so quick in your judgment if your ATV battery acts the same way.


Unlike the battery in your everyday ride your ATV battery may go for prolonged periods without the benefit of an alternator pumping juice back into it. Make sure your ATV battery is actually "dead" and not just fully discharged before you go to the expense of a new battery. This article will explain how to test your battery and how to keep it maintained during the off season.


Things You'll Need:

  • Ratchet wrench and socket set
  • Replacement battery
  • Distilled water
  • Vinegar or baking soda
  • Old shop towel

Removing and Replacing the ATV Battery

Different brands will have different locations but many copy motorcycles and place the battery under the seat. Check your owner's manual for the exact location of yours.


  1. The first step is to remove the seat. Under the rear of the saddle there will be a latch that releases the back of the seat. There are two tabs or prongs that secure the front of the seat. With the back of the seat free, pull back and up to disengage the front tabs and set the seat aside. The battery is now accessible.
  2. If your battery cables are bolted to the battery terminals, use a socket to remove the negative cable first then the positive.
  3. There will be a retaining bar that secures the battery to the battery compartment. Unbolt and remove.
  4. If you have battery acid on the terminals or the ends of your cables take a solution of vinegar and water or baking soda and water and wash it off using the old towel. Remove the battery and set it to the side. Take this opportunity to clean any acid from the battery compartment.
  5. Place the new battery in the battery compartment.
  6. Connect the positive cable to the positive post first. Tighten the connection.
  7. Connect the negative cable to the negative post and tighten the connection.
  8. Re-install the retaining bar.
  9. Re-install the seat.

How to Get More Life Out of Your Battery

As a rule your battery will lose 1% of its charge for every day it is not in use. So if you don't ride your machine for 30 days your battery probably has a 70% charge. If you let the battery sit idle for 60 days you may have hit the point where it simply won't be possible to recover a full charge.


Here are a couple of things you don't want to do to recharge your battery.

  • Don't fire up the engine every day or so and let the engine idle for a moment. You will suck more power out of the battery starting the engine than the alternator can possibly replace. Also you will most likely foul your plugs.
  • Idling the engine for a prolonged time won't work any better. At idle RPM the stator will take forever to provide a significant recharge.

The best solution is to invest in a battery tender. This is a trickle charger that connects to your battery posts and plugs into a wall socket. It will slowly charge your battery and then keep it fully charged. It takes 5 minutes to hook up and guarantees you'll have the amps when you need them.


If you are done for a season, remove the battery and place it on a work table and connect it to the battery tender so you will have a fully charged unit when you get back on the saddle next season. These batteries are expensive and they don't last as long as car batteries. Taking the time to care for them can give you the biggest bang for your buck.


- End of Procedure -


Return to all Repair & Install Guides